More evidence of a connection between phthalates and behavioral problems.

by Nick
(Montreal)

A new study is coming out soon, adding more evidence to the belief that there is a direct connection between prenatal exposure to phthalates and behavioral problems in children.

Here is part of the announcement.

"A new study led by Mount Sinai researchers in collaboration with scientists from Cornell University and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has found higher prenatal exposure to phthalates—manmade chemicals that interfere with hormonal messaging—to be connected with disruptive and problem behaviors in children between the ages of 4 and 9 years. The study, which is the first to examine the effects of prenatal phthalate exposure on child neurobehavioral development, will be published January 28, on the Environmental Health Perspectives website."

There is something deeply disturbing about reading of these studies and knowing there will be a significant lag time before governments or companies take any action. The public fight right now is over BPA and its effects on health. How long do we have to wait for the media and legislators to start paying attention to the dangers of phthalates?

Read the full announcement here...

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